Information Resources & Toolkit (Part 1)

I am compiling a series of links, references and resource snippets throughout this concept initiative five+ years broad range of topics ~ and still on going; for the (however-few) visitors and readers to my channel. This is in addition to the 300+ combined citations I prepared and sought myself both for the parent and the accompanying manuscript. Due to the sheer length and obvious complexity this entire writeup will likely consist of multiple on-going parts.

Disclaimer

By no means this entire writeup represents confidence to replace any existing scientific peer reviewed literatures nor intend to replace existing clinical supervisions. I aim to revise these with further topics as time allows from my own end. All these are strictly for preliminary conveniences only for readers new or old to this concept initiative. Please conduct firstly with your guiding physician where applicable, and before conducting your own N=1 brainstorming. Your own health remains ultimately your own indemnity.

Due to enforced paternalism, direct copying and paste is prohibitive, despite benevolent intent. Unless if a reference originated from either as Creative Commons or that of Public Domains  ~ I may only share links, URLs and/or citations of the authors, affiliates and/or sources on those that bear sensitive trademarks or copyrighting.

Live-It-Forward, AW.


Insulin / HOMA IR Calculators

Omni Calculators contains a very impressive array of calculators. These are not conventional calculators; but with proper UX and UI included; and on top – they have approx ten (10) at least to the date of writing this resources toolkit ~ diabetes & insulin resistance risk calculators. Each and every calculator page is also presented with peer-reviewed & supported academia overview alongside any formulas used in each calculations.

In particular, the Insulin HOMA IR calculators are easy to use and that two (2) results are automatically given  ~ based on the HOMA IR and/or”QUICKI” Model (Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index) formula.

Omni calculators can be extremely comprehensive, from biochemistry, physics all the way to finances / investments + others ~ that it is likely a surmounting importance amongst statisticians and all practitioners. Approx counting on all “Health” category alone nets around 300+ individual calculators

Nonetheless for those who wish to go by a DIY calculation route, I have created a formulaic diagram as illustrated below.

HOMA IR DIY Calculation (using Serum fasting values)

Insulinogenic Index of various foods.

We have common measures of glycemic index on various foods. But what about the insulin index? The following is an extract accordingly from Wikipedia®.

Mean average glucose,[1] insulin[1] and satiety scores[3]
Food Food Type Glycemic score Insulin score Satiety score
Whole-meal bread[n 2] Carbohydrate-rich 97 ± 17 96 ± 12 157
White rice Carbohydrate-rich 110 ± 15 79 ± 12 138
White pasta Carbohydrate-rich 46 ± 10 40 ± 5 119
White bread (baseline) Carbohydrate-rich 100 ± 0 100 ± 0 100
Sustain Breakfast cereal 66 ± 6 71 ± 6 112
Special K Breakfast cereal 70 ± 9 66 ± 5 116
Potatoes Carbohydrate-rich 141 ± 35 121 ± 11 323
Potato chips Snack/confectionery 52 ± 9 61 ± 14 91
Porridge Breakfast cereal 60 ± 12 40 ± 4 209
Popcorn Snack/confectionery 62 ± 16 54 ± 9 154
Peanuts Snack/confectionery 12 ± 4 20 ± 5 84
Oranges Fruit 39 ± 7 60 ± 3 202
Muesli Breakfast cereal 43 ± 7 46 ± 5 100
Mars Bars Snack/confectionery 79 ± 13 122 ± 15 70
Low Fat Strawberry Yogurt Snack/confectionery 62 ± 15 115 ± 13 88
Lentils in tomato sauce Protein-rich 62 ± 22 58 ± 12 133
Jellybeans Snack/confectionery 118 ± 18 160 ± 16 118[n 3]
Ice cream Snack/confectionery 70 ± 19 89 ± 13 96
Honeysmacks Breakfast cereal 60 ± 7 67 ± 6 132
Grapes Fruit 74 ± 9 82 ± 6 162
Grain bread[n 1] Carbohydrate-rich 60 ± 12 56 ± 6 154
French fries Carbohydrate-rich 71 ± 16 74 ± 12 116
Fish Protein-rich 28 ± 13 59 ± 18 225
Eggs Protein-rich 42 ± 16 31 ± 6 150
Doughnuts Bakery product 63 ± 12 74 ± 9 68
Croissants Bakery product 74 ± 9 79 ± 14 47
Crackers Bakery product 118 ± 24 87 ± 12 127
Cornflakes Breakfast cereal 76 ± 11 75 ± 8 118
Cookies Bakery product 74 ± 11 92 ± 15 120
Cheese Protein-rich 55 ± 18 45 ± 13 146
Cake Bakery product 56 ± 14 82 ± 12 65
Brown rice Carbohydrate-rich 104 ± 18 62 ± 11 132
Brown pasta Carbohydrate-rich 68 ± 10 40 ± 5 188
Beef Protein-rich 21 ± 8 51 ± 16 176
Bananas Fruit 79 ± 10 81 ± 5 118
Baked beans in tomato sauce Protein-rich 114 ± 18 120 ± 19 168
Average: Breakfast cereal 59 ± 3 57 ± 3 134
Average: Carbohydrate-rich 88 ± 6 74 ± 8 158.6
Average: Protein-rich 54 ± 7 61 ± 7 166.3
Average: Fruit 61 ± 5 71 ± 3 169.75
Average: Snack/confectionery 65 ± 6 89 ± 7 100.1
Average: Bakery product 77 ± 7 83 ± 5 85.4
Average: Average 67.333 ± 5.7 72.5 ± 6 135.7
Average: ALL 68.8 ± 12.7105 72 ± 9.5 136
Apples Fruit 50 ± 6 59 ± 4 197
All-Bran Breakfast cereal 40 ± 7 32 ± 4 151
Food Food Type Glycemic index score Insulin index score Satiety score

On a semantic rating = Less than 50 on both GI / insulin index rating is considered green. 60-70 = orange / alert. >70 = detrimental.

Another noteworthy independent initiative is by Marty @ Optimising Nutrition (2015). Here, a very good article explains the pros and current limitations and/or challenges at interpreting the Insulin index data. Much of the explanation refers to the same source as per to the sample tabulation above  (Holt, S et. al. 1997). However for those who are time poor, Martin went to great length at providing charts and graphs at showcasing which macronutrient biases affect insulin responses. Plus other questions that are commonly asked (protein>sugar dilemma debate to name a few). Hence in the interest not to discount nor dismiss all his effort, I encourage all to instead visit the dedicated article @ Optimising Nutrition.

If that is not enough reading ~ an entire master thesis submission (Bell, K. 2014) + attached collateral reasearch (as full length appendixes) + more tabulation of GI load as well as insulin indexes are shared openly within all this one (1) PDF file ~ 84 pages total.  

(A short thought on “Satiety” rating”).

My preliminary  response on the above inclusion of “Satiety”, were I to be honest, slightly lean towards skepticism. “Satiety”  is one subject that I humbly believe most underestimate their immense complexity as I proclaimed within my book . It is a topic that is not exclusively confined by way of biochemistry explanation alone (and be done with it), but often branching to many other complex disciplines ~ neuroscience / neurochemistry and pscyhiatry included. For those who wish to pursue further research on these would be well advised to follow Stefan Guyenet PHD; whom many would no doubt be familiar over his research on Leptin, reward aspects of food, and more such connected topics.

FODMAPS ~ Protocol and Common foods.

FODMAPS are fermentable group of carbohydrates often highlighted amongst legitimate concerns of nutrigenomics and food sensitivities.

In addition to the links openly shared within my parent manuscript I decided to repost them here for convenience. However as per paternalism copyright in place ~ I am forbidden to directly copy and paste any useful or actionable ~ data.  Hence for these  – I shall only share various links and references where and whenever applicable.

Food additives and preservatives.

Due to many dozens if not hundred(s) of suspecting additives it is impossible to share any section for concise readibility.

However, at the very least a notable source (FedUp) ~ has been a long standing and trusted for more than a decade explaining the notable dangers  throughout our food supply. If you are a carer a particularly for and amongst youth whom are susceptible to these additives ~ this I shall highly recommend an essential bookmark.

Oxalates Content of various foods.

Beware that any calculators – may or may not ultimately cover each and every individual food items in the database. Hence it is important in my opinion to also seek out other alternative sources that also covers item(s) that are not included, as suggested below:

Please click here to go for a more indepth article. Otherwise a sharing of useful links are recollated as per above.

This concludes a WIP/ work in progress statement for the Information & Resources toolkit Part 1.

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